“Oh, Marilyn!” group exhibition at Gazelli Art House, London includes Boty’s works

Pauline Boty, A Big Hand, collage with gold gilt paint, 1961

Running from 21 January to 12 March 2022, the exhibition is dedicated to the 60s wave of female emancipation in the UK and US and features Pauline Boty together with Judy Chicago, Penny Slinger and Jann Haworth.

“Showing for the second time at the gallery, Pauline Boty (1938–1966) was a founder of the British pop art and Britain’s most notable pop art painter. Her paintings and collage work often made references to female sexuality as well as current affairs, criticising the nature of the “man’s world.” On display in the exhibition is Angel (60s) and A Big Hand (ca. 1961), a collage work depicting a female hand holding sculptural figures from Rome’s Trevi Fountain above a Victorian park scene.

Gallery artist Jann Haworth (b. 1942) moved to London from Los Angeles in 1961 to study at the Slade School of Fine Art, becoming a pioneer of soft sculptures that led her to challenge the notion of female form serving as a muse or object of desire. Exhibited works include the Pom Pom Girl (1964-65), China Cabinet (1963–1964), Dog (1962), Linder Doll (1965), Still Life Marble Fabric ( 1962) and Rhinestones (1963–64).

Penny Slinger (b. 1947) explores feminism and eroticism through work including photography, film and sculpture. On display are a series of vintage black and white photographs from the artist’s subversive Bride Book (1973) and works from her 1973 series Mouthpieces.

Multidisciplinary artist Judy Chicago was a trailblazing pioneer the feminist movement in the 1960s and ’70s; for decades, she has made work that celebrates the multiplicity of female identity. The exhibition features And She Vomited up the Sun and the Moon and then the night had its Own Light (1981) and her pyrotechnic Atmospheres series.

The exhibition title draws on the 60th death anniversary of Marilyn Monroe, whose death represented a departure point for female empowerment. A portion of proceeds will be donated to Women’s Aid.” [from the Gazelli Art House website]

Gazell Art House,
39 Dover Street,
London W1S 4NN
Tel: +44 207 491 8816
Link to exhibition website: [link]

New page – Sources: “It’s a Man’s Word I” – identifies ancient Greek sculpture and source for the first time

Key for “It’s a Man’s World I”, 1964.

The key above showing the different individuals and objects assembled by Pauline Boty for one of her most important works, her 1964 painting “It’s a Man’s Word I”, has now been added to the site. Among the figures newly-identified are the 4th century BC Greek statue of Hermes and also Thelonius Monk as a likely contender for another of those represented.
As stated on the page, it is greatly hoped that in time the sources of all the items chosen by Boty to make up the work will be identified and the list on this page completed.
All comments, corrections, clarifications and suggestions on this item would be greatly appreciated, via the Contact form here: [link]
The new page can be accessed here: [link]

New book and exhibition dedicated to Peter Blake’s collages

“Peter Blake: Collage” published by Waddington Custot in partnership with Thames & Hudson

This first complete overview of collage by Peter Blake, from his early assemblages to his most recent work has been published by Waddington Custot in partnership with Thames & Hudson.

The publication coincides with the opening of “Peter Blake: Time Traveller”, a new exhibition at Waddington Custot [until 13 August] charting the development of Blake’s approach to collage-making, beginning with his layering of subject matter in early painted compositions and experiments with collaged paper after encountering work by Kurt Schwitters in the 1950s. From here, the exhibition travels via Blake’s rise to prominence as the ‘Godfather of British Pop art’ to his current, self-proclaimed Late Period. From his found object constructions to his most recent digital print photo-collages, Blake has broadened the scope of what collage can comprise and what it can communicate. Peter Blake: Time Traveller includes works from Blake’s Alphabet and Museum of Black and White series, as well as pieces made in homage to fellow artists Sonia Delaunay, Kurt Schwitters and Robert Rauschenberg. Clowns, wrestlers and Icons are shown alongside work around souvenirs and holiday postcards. [from the Waddington Custot website].

Works from “Joseph Cornell’s Holiday” at Waddington Custot in the exhibition “Peter Blake: Time Traveller”

Boty makes an appearance in both the book and the exhibition, including within Blake’s recent collage series Joseph Cornell’s Holiday.

EXHIBITION DETAILS

Peter Blake: Time Traveller
18 June–13 August 2021
Waddington Custot, 11 Cork Street, London W1S 3LT

Time slots for the exhibition can be booked here: [link]

BOOK SPECIFICATIONS

Title: Peter Blake: Collage
Publisher: Waddington Custot in partnership with Thames & Hudson
Format: Hardback without Jacket
Dimensions: 300 x 250mm
Pages: 316 pp
ISBN: 9780500971123
Price: £50

The book is available to buy here: [link]

New page on Pauline Boty’s collaged wall added to the site

Pauline Boty: collaged wall key for 1964 Roger Mayne photo, v2, March 2021

The collaged wall created by Pauline Boty and photographed by Roger Mayne in 1964 has now been added to the site together with the numbered key shown above identifying some 60 items so far.
As stated on the page, it is greatly hoped that this will provide a starting point for identifying the array of items chosen by Boty to adorn the wall, and that in time more of them will be identified and the list expanded further.
All comments, corrections, clarifications and suggestions from visitors to the site in this regard would be greatly appreciated, via the Contact form here: [link]
The new page can be accessed here: [link]

Map showing locations of works now added

The screen grab below is of a new map added to the website showing the locations of Pauline Boty’s works in galleries and museums around the world. The map itself is available here [link]
NB: not all are permanently on display however, so please be sure to check with the institution in question before making a trip specifically to see a work.

Please note: above shows a screen shot only of the map. Please visit the page itself to see all locations.

Slideshow and sources info for collages added to the site

The slideshow below of Pauline Boty’s collages shown in Ken Russell’s 1962 documentary Pop Goes the Easel  has now also been added to the Collages section of the site [link] as detailed in a previous News item here [link].

In addition a new page has been added giving information on the sources of titles for a number of collages here [link].

Images of Boty’s lost collages seen in “Pop Goes the Easel” to be shown on paulineboty.org

“Untitled (I surrender dear)”, collage, c. 1961. Screen grab from “Pop Goes the Easel”. © Estate of Pauline Boty

I would like to thank the BBC Photo Library for their assistance in confirming that copyright for the images of Pauline Boty’s works shown in Ken Russell’s 1962 documentary Pop Goes the Easel resides with the Estate of Pauline Boty, and am delighted therefore to be able to include them on this website.
Commissioned by BBC Television for its Monitor series, Russell’s film includes 16 of Boty’s works shown initially full screen and face-on and then side-on whilst she sat with Peter Blake to discuss their content and sources of imagery. The titles aren’t discussed, but as mentioned in the previous News item, the hope is to ultimately match at least some of them to those of works exhibited in the Blake, Boty, Porter, Reeve exhibition which took place at the AIA Gallery whilst the programme was being filmed.

For UK viewers, Pop Goes the Easel is currently available on iPlayer here: [link]

Updated Collages section on the website with many titles added

“Blake, Boty, Porter, Reeve” list of works; AIA Gallery; 30 November – 29 December 1961

Much thanks are due to Geoffrey Reeve for sending in a copy of the list of works that include those shown by Pauline Boty in the group exhibition Blake, Boty, Porter, Reeve at the AIA Gallery in London in late 1961 which have now been added to the Collages listed here on the website. Many of these works, now sadly presumed lost, made an appearance in Ken Russell’s Pop Goes the Easel, originally broadcast by the BBC as part of the Monitor series of arts programme on 25th March 1962. Ultimately it is hoped further research will enable at least some of the lost collages shown in the film to be matched to their titles.