Phaidon’s “Great Women Artists” includes Pauline Boty and “Colour Her Gone”

Pauline Boty’s page with “Colour Her Gone” in Phaidon’s new book “Great Women Artists”. Picture credit: Purchased with the assistance of the Art Fund and the Friends of Wolverhampton Arts and Heritage. Wolverhampton Art Gallery, West Midlands, UK / Bridgeman Images.

“Five centuries of fascinating female creativity presented in more than 400 compelling artworks and one comprehensive volume: The most extensive fully illustrated book of women artists ever published, Great Women Artists reflects an era where art made by women is more prominent than ever. In museums, galleries, and the art market, previously overlooked female artists, past and present, are now gaining recognition and value.

Featuring more than 400 artists from more than 50 countries and spanning 500 years of creativity, each artist is represented here by a key artwork and short text. This essential volume reveals a parallel yet equally engaging history of art for an age that champions a greater diversity of voices.” from the Phaidon website

SPECIFICATIONS
Format: Hardback
Size: 290 x 250 mm (11 3/8 x 9 7/8 in)
Pages: 464 pp
Illustrations: 450 illustrations
ISBN: 9780714878775

More information available here: link

Evelyne Axell exhibition in Namur references influence of Pauline Boty on collage work

Exhibition poster, Service de la Culture de la Province de Namur

From 21 September 2019 to 26 January 2020, Evelyne Axell: Pop Methods”: a major exhibition of the work of Evelyne Axell (Namur, 1935 – Zwijnaerde 1972) is to open the artistic season at the new renovated and extended Delta (previously the Maison de la Culture de Namur – Cultural and Art centre of Namur).
This large-scale event will include paintings, collages, sketches, preparatory drawings, and documents bearing witness to the artist’s working methods and providing opportunities to explore her specific methods, including her use of numerous photographic self-portraits.
At the peak of her time, Evelyne Axell succeeded in mastering the new materials that became available (plexiglass, fur, etc.) to break out of the confines of canvas and experiment, for example, with opaline plexiglass transparencies. Her work reveals her own view of a world gathering pace, where eroticism goes hand in hand with a feminist discourse. The exceptional discovery of 17 of her first works, never exhibited before, provides an opportunity to explore the early stages of her plastic work. These are mainly collages dating from 1964 – which show in particular the influence of English Pop artists (Pauline Boty and Peter Phillips particularly).
This exhibition, conceived in close collaboration with her son, Philippe Antoine, is set to travel through several European countries.

Service de la Culture de la Province de Namur Le Delta / Arts Plastiques / Expositions, Avenue Reine Astrid, 22 B B – 5000 Namur, Belgium


Early Pauline Boty painting discovered!

Untitled by Pauline Boty, 1959, oil on card laid on canvas. 69 x 51 cm
Untitled, 1959, oil on card laid on canvas. 69 x 51 cm

Dating from Boty’s time at the RCA [Royal College of Art] this untitled work has hints of the sensuality she would develop further with some of her key Pop art paintings, but with a palette of autumnal hues she rarely used again. The work is of oil on card laid on canvas and at 69 x 51 cm is large compared to most other surviving works from the period. Excitingly and very unusually it is also prominently signed and dated “Boty.59” on the front.

For further details please enquire using the Contact form or via info@paulineboty.org

Detail of signature and date on recently discovered painting by Pauline Boty.
A rare example of a work by Boty signed and dated on the painting itself.

60 Years rehang at Tate Britain

60 Years continues the Walk through British Art with work by women artists from the 1960s to the present day and includes Boty’s Portrait of Derek Marlowe with Unknown Ladies, recently acquired for Tate Britain.

“Portrait of Derek Marlowe with Unknown Ladies” on display at Tate Britain.

“This new display is organised into three sections – Structures, Portraits, and Humour and Strangeness. Together the works represent key ideas in recent British art and celebrate its diversity. All works are by women artists.

Women artists have been under-represented in comparison to their male counterparts. This is an opportunity to question the historical bias, with selected pieces from Tate’s collection showing that the story of art can be told by women artists alone. Artists include Tracey Emin, Mona Hatoum, Rachel Whiteread and Lynette Yiadom-Boakye.

60 Years reflects Tate’s ongoing commitment to increasing representation of women artists across its galleries.

This display has been curated by Sofia Karamani”

From the Tate website [link]